Revocable Living Trust

revocable-living-trust-signature-documentsUnlike a will, trusts do not require any form of probate. A trust agreement allows you to name a successor trustee who will carry out the terms of the trust agreement in the event of your death. During your lifetime, you, the creator of the trust (the trustor) maintains control of the assets in the trust. Some of the more common trust agreements we offer include:

  • Revocable/Irrevocable Family Trusts – standard trusts that allow you to park your assets protecting them from probate. These trust documents allow you to name a person, a trustee, to manage or distribute assets after your death.
    • Trust-Articles I thru X
    • Schedule of Assets
    • Specific Bequests of Property
    • Asset Ledger Survivor’s Sub-trust
    • Qualified Election Sub-trust
    • Decedent’s Sub-Trust
    • Certificate of Trust
    • Living Will
    • Power of Attorney
    • Power of Attorney for Health Care
    • Power of Attorney for Mental Health Care
    • HIPAA Release and Authorization
    • Funeral and Burial Instructions
    • Last Will and Testament (Pour-Over Will)
    • Specific Bequests
    • Guidelines for Successor Trustees
    • 1 Quit Claim Deed
    • Medical Certifications
    • Information Packet
    • Funding Instructions
    • Request for Retitlement of Assets
    • Notebook with Tabs and Footnotes
    • Notarization Work
    • Trust Signing-Documents Explained, Notarized,
    • and Executed – 1 Hour Session
    • Funding of the Trust
  • Guardianship Trusts – set up for the benefit of minor children, this trust serves a dual purpose of holding assets for the benefit of a minor child as well as giving a person control over those assets until such time as the minor child is an adult.
  • Special Needs Trusts – when a family member has a disability or special needs that will require they receive care after your death, a special needs trust allows you to designate assets for that person’s benefit. During your lifetime you control the assets and upon your death, a successor trustee takes over and continues to provide for the needs of your loved one.
  • Pet Trusts – For many people their pets are considered family members. Therefore, it is important these family members are cared for upon your death. Clients normally designate where their pets should go, who should care for them, and occasionally leave money for their care. We have also dealt with high needs animals, such as horses and farm animals, as well as birds and turtles that have life spans of 100 years and require long term planning.
  • Gun Trust – Do you have a collection of guns or family heirloom weapons, such as your grandfather’s shotgun, you’d like to pass to your heirs? Some families have Samurai Swords, Claymores, Military Sabers or other weapons that they want to stay in the family. If this applies to you, you might need a Gun Trust. Gun Trusts can be used to purchase, as well as pass down, antique or collectable weapons, silencers and other such items to your heirs.
  • Other Specialty Trusts – After 30 years of experience and thousands of clients we understand each case is unique and your family may have special circumstances. We have helped our clients through a variety of special situations and are qualified to assist you as well. We will work closely with you to determine which trust agreements best meet your individual needs.

Trusts are the best tool to avoid probate and ensure your wishes are carried out. We can help you decide if a trust is right for you and your estate and determine which type of trust would be best for you and your heirs. Call us today at (623) 974-2272 to set up a FREE consultation for your trust agreement planning.